Examples of Supported Kubernetes Operator SDK workflows

This blog post is part of the series How to leverage Kubernetes operators using the Operator SDK framework.

IN PREVIOUS BLOG POSTS WE TALKED ABOUT:

Section 1 – Operators, Operator Framework, and Operators SDK: 

  • Here we discuss in a general setting about Operators, Operator Framework, and Operators SDK.
  • Then we will discuss about the Operators SDK emerging popularity in GitHub, and in general about the “Operator SDK workflow” adopted for generating and handling operators.

Section 2 – Supported Kubernetes Operator SDK workflows

  • Here we discuss about the three available alternative workflows to generate Operators provided by the last versions of Operator SDK APIs.
  • We also discuss pros and cons of using the various operators workflows.

IN THIS BLOG POST WE WILL TALK ABOUT:

Section 3 – Examples of Supported Kubernetes Operator SDK workflows

  • Here we provide examples of the three available alternative workflows to generate Operators provided by the Operator SDK APIs.
  • We specifically focus on Go operators, as they are in our opinion the more stable available APIs.

Section 3 – Examples of Supported Kubernetes Operator SDK workflows

We will refer to:

1) Operator: Go operator 

2) Operator: Ansible operator [coming soon]

3) Operator: Helm operator [coming soon]

 

For each of these SDK supported workflows, we provide:

a) a description of the generated Operator structure (there is one for each specific workflow);

b) a link to our example(s) of operator(s) based on such Operator structure (there is one for each specific workflow) and logic.

c) descriptions on how to add (e.g., 3rd Party) Resources, different from the Core Kubernetes resource types, to your Operator 

d) a description of the main pros and cons of using suchOperator structures (there is one for each specific workflow) and logic.

Back to overview

Back to overview How to leverage Kubernetes operators using the Operator SDK framework.