VSHN.timer #47: Better Writing Better Code

Welcome to another VSHN.timer! Every Monday, 5 links related to Kubernetes, OpenShift, CI / CD, and DevOps; all stuff coming out of our own chat system, making us think, laugh, or simply work better.

This week we’re going to talk about small tips and tricks to help us efficiently develop apps of any kind (with a slight preference for cloud native ones, of course!)

1. Writing code is easier said than done, particularly for those new to the craft. So many options for nearly everything we do! Fear not, Mickey Muldoon has recently compiled an excellent list of 20 rules to solve common conundrums faced by software developers, juniors and seniors alike. Worth a re-read every so often.

https://muldoon.cloud/programming/2020/04/17/programming-rules-thumb.html

2. PostgreSQL is (by far) one of the most popular database engines ever created. As workloads move to The Cloud, it can become tricky to configure it properly, so that apps can scale and users can be sure that their data is safe. For this reason Sorint.lab created stolon, a cloud native high availability manager for PostgreSQL. And they published a blog post to explain it in detail. What else?

https://sgotti.dev/post/stolon-introduction/

3. Python is simply put a de facto standard in the realm of programming languages. But it remains somewhat daunting for newcomers, given the size of the Python ecosystem, to know exactly which tools and versions to install for testing, documentation, and many other tasks. Thankfully Claudio Jolowicz came to the rescue and described his idea of a „hypermodern“ Python setup with all best practices, in a series of six blog posts: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6.

https://cjolowicz.github.io/posts/hypermodern-python-01-setup/

4. It is safe to assume you use Git, right? Well, who doesn’t, anyway? If you’re a fan of git diff you will love delta, a syntax-highlighter for git and diff output. Your workflow (and your eyes) will thank you for it.

https://github.com/dandavison/delta

5. The tool of the week is regex101.com, a free tool to design (and test) regular expressions. It features a very useful bonus: regex code generation in various languages: C#, Go, Java, PHP, Ruby, Rust… Just don’t use it to parse e-mail addresses. Pretty please. That’s a very bad idea.

https://regex101.com/

What other tools do you use to simplify your life as a coder? Do you actually use regular expressions to parse e-mail? Seriously? Do you have any other tips you would like to share with the community? Get in touch with us through the form at the bottom of this page, and see you next week for another edition of VSHN.timer.