VSHN.timer #46: Kubernetes Dashboards

Welcome to another VSHN.timer! Every Monday, 5 links related to Kubernetes, OpenShift, CI / CD, and DevOps; all stuff coming out of our own chat system, making us think, laugh, or simply work better.

This week we’re going to talk about the weirdest possible idea used to manage Kubernetes clusters. And how to build your own!

1. Kubernetes specialists make a living typing the kubectl many times a day (or the oc command if you are interacting with OpenShift.) They usually keep a few browser windows open, with Rancher, the OpenShift web console, the standard Kubernetes web UI, or a simpler k9s running in a terminal window. But for teams who might feel that these tools aren’t enough (or instead, that they do too much) here’s a tutorial explaining how to build your own real-time Kubernetes dashboard as a simple web page.

https://learnk8s.io/real-time-dashboard

2. How about having a conversation with your Kubernetes clusters on the company chat? Well that’s exactly what BotKube does. It provides basic management facilities that can be integrated into Slack, Mattermost, and other chat systems thanks to an open architecture, so that DevOps engineers can run kubectl commands directly from their current chat system. Very smart and fun to use!

https://www.botkube.io/

3. Kubernetes remains a complex beast, and it can be difficult to manage it properly; in that case you might want to use something like the kubernetes-common-services project, which handles for you the installation and management of services such as cert-manager, nginx-ingress and Prometheus. And if all else fails, just contact us!

https://github.com/ManagedKube/kubernetes-common-services

4. The Kubernetes ecosystem is exploding with solutions and ideas; take for example oneinfra, the Kubernetes as a Service project. As expected it features its own terminal tool, its own web console, and many other components. We suppose you can use oneinfra to run a onedev instance?

https://github.com/oneinfra/oneinfra

5. The tool of the week is (of course!) the most enterprise-friendly of all Kubernetes dashboards: a spreadsheet! Perfect for understaffed startups where the CFO might need to scale a few deployments while keeping an eye on the last quarter revenue figures.

https://github.com/learnk8s/xlskubectl

How do manage your deployments? Have you created your own dashboard (or spreadsheet)? Do you have any tips you would like to share with the community? Get in touch with us through the form at the bottom of this page, and see you next week for another edition of VSHN.timer.